FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

RIO HAS SO MANY DIFFERENT FLY LINES AND TAPERS. WHICH ONE SHOULD I USE?

There are many factors that influence how well a line casts; casting skill, wind, fly choice, type of rod, required casting distance, to name a few. To overcome some of these differences RIO designs every fly lines with specific tapers and weight distribution to make that fly line perform exceptionally well in a certain range of disciplines. No single fly line will do every job perfectly, which is why there are so many variations. 

The very best way to dial in the perfect fly line is to follow the paths that RIO's line selector takes you. A few clicks and you can find the perfect fly line for a particular rod and fishing situation. Click here to go to our line selector and learn more.


COULD YOU PLEASE TELL ME WHAT I SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT USE TO CLEAN A FLY LINE?

Many plastic cleaners/polishes contain solvents that attack the fly line's PVC coating, and can cause it to dry out, resulting in fly line cracking. Other enemies of fly lines include most aerosol sprays (the propellants, actually), insect repellents containing DEET, solvents, gasoline, sunscreen, and excessive heat and sunlight. 


A fly line's life will certainly be prolonged by some kind of cleaning and maintenance, and this video is a great starting place to find out the best way. 


Part 2 of the video can be watched here.

I JUST BOUGHT A VERSITIP LINE, WHEN I OPENED THE PACKAGE AND INSPECTED THE TAGS ON THE TIPS THEY SAID THAT THEY ALL HAD THE SAME GRAIN WEIGHT. IF THEY ALL WEIGH THE SAME, HOW CAN THEY POSSIBLY SINK AT DIFFERENT SPEEDS?

An easy analogy is to take a pound of cork and a pound of lead. Both weigh 1 pound, but the lead will sink and the cork will float. It is not the weight that makes them sink or float. It is the density. We manufacture the tips to a specific density, and as a consequence, a specific sink rate. It is important that the tips weigh the same, as this ensures the weight of the whole head does not change as tips are changed.

IF I CUT OFF THE FRONT WELDED LOOP ON A FLY LINE, WILL THIS AFFECT THE LINE?

You will have no problem, and will not compromise the fly lines taper, if you cut off the welded loop - unless you cut off more than 6", as we build each fly line with a level 6" tip at the front end. Many traditionalists do cut the loop off and add a butt section with a nail knot to get the lightest join between leader and fly line possible. 

If you do accidentally cut the loop off, or cut it off and then wish you hadn't, you can make a home-made welded loop. To see how, watch this video. Even though this video is aimed at sinking "T" material, you can do this with most other lines we make.


WHY SHOULD I BUY A RIO FLY LINE?

RIO manufactures its own fly lines, and with ever evolving technologies that result it more accurate tapers, longer lasting lines, and better performance on the water. The low humidity, high desert air and continuous durability testing ensures the overall quality of RIO lines are unmatched in the industry.


In addition, RIO's staff are passionate fly fishers and have an intensive R&D program, both on the water and in the lab. Heavy field testing by RIO staff as well as input from ambassadors, guides, dealers, and fly fishers everywhere results in fly lines that perform flawlessly.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO ATTACH A BRAIDED LOOP TO MY FLY LINE?

Braided loops are easy to fray and it is just a case of getting the knack of sliding it on without the fray. Though easy, it is very hard to describe in words. Start by cutting off all the fray before you attempt to put the line in. Make sure the sleeve is on the braided loop, as well. Slip a medium large needle into the end of the braid and gently heat the needle and rotate the needle at the same time. Be careful not to let the flame touch the braid otherwise it will burn a hole in it!


Heat the needle for about 5 seconds, then pull it out and you should be left with a large opening in the end of the braid. Cut off the burnt ends and carefully slide the fly line into the wide mouth. The heat serves two purposes, it opens up a larger hole and it sets the braid making it harder to fray. You can still fray it by rushing the line up the braid, but this is the best way of going about it.


Finally, pull the tubing down over the connection, being sure to cover the end of the braid. If you do not want to use the tubing, apply a little 'crazy glue' to keep the braid tight and eliminate fraying.


If this is even mildly confusing, try watching this video.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO REMOVE TWIST FROM A FLY LINE?

The first thing to do is to check if the line has "twist" or "memory". To do so, hold a 6ft piece of the fly line where the "twist" is, and bring your two hands together until they are about 2" apart. If the line has twist, the resulting hanging coil will spin together. If it doesn't spin, your line has "memory".


Memory is where the shape of the spool the line was coiled on to before pulling it off the reel is "remembered" and the line stays in the slight coil shapes off the reel or spool. This is more common when using "tropical" fly lines in cooler conditions, as we use a stiffer core and coating for tropical lines that relaxes in the heat of a typical tropical day's fishing.  This is also more commonly occurring in lines with a single strand monofilament core than a braided core, as these cores are much stiffer than the limp braids we use.


If a line has memory and you want to remove it, simply stretch the line between your hands. It only requires a force of around 2lbs to anneal (pull straight) the cores we use, no matter how cold the conditions. Strip off all the line you are going to cast, and then start from the reel end, working your way back to the leader end until the whole section of line is as straight as you want.


To get rid of twist, you can do one of three things: 1) If you experience a lot of twist while on a boat, ask your captain to troll at low speed. Cut your fly off the leader, or take off the leader. Run all the fly line out in the water behind the boat for a few minutes then wind the line in. 2) If you are on a river, again cut the fly off, and let the whole line wash downstream of you. Leave it for about a minute and then wind in. 3) If you are on a lake,with no current, again, cut the fly off and walk through some grass with the whole section of line trailing behind you for about 300 yards. In all 3 examples, the line will untwist easily and quickly, and can then be wound in.