FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

RIO has so many different trout lines and tapers. Which one should I use?


Could you please tell me what I should or should not use to clean or dress fly lines?


I have a 9' 6 wt. I'll be fishing from a drift boat as well as from the bank. I'll be casting everything from dries to streamers. What line do you suggest?


I just bought a VersiTip line, when I opened the package and inspected the tags on the tips they said that they all had the same grain weight. If they all weigh the same, how can they possibly sink at different speeds?


I'm the owner of a 6wt Rio Grand. I like the loop. However, I have been unable to tie a surgeons loop small enough to make a proper connection. If I cut off the loop, will this affect the line? Can you put a butt section on the line?


What are the sink rates for the three types of sink tips?


If I want to use an interchangeable sink tip, how and where do I put it?


What is SlickShooter and how do I attach it to my line?


Why is SlickShooter better than other shooting lines?


I fish the John Day River in Oregon. I fish an 8 wt rod. My question is, What is the best sink tip, and the best floating line to use?


Why should I buy a RIO fly line?


I received a package of RIO braided loops. When attempting to work the flyline down the braid toward the loop the braid is completely unraveling. What an I doing wrong? How should I be doing this procedure?


Why do I get coils and/or memory in my fly line?

RIO has so many different trout lines and tapers. Which one should I use?

There are many factors that influence how well a fly line is cast; the wind, the fly choice, type of rod, distance cast, to name a few. To overcome some of these differences RIO has designed their fly lines with specific tapers. Here is a very simple summary of which RIO fly line performs best for typical applications:

RIO Gold - Very stable line, long head and mid length front taper makes this the best general purpose weight forward line on offer from RIO

RIO Grand - Fast action rods, great line for novices and casters that like a little extra load.

Trout LT - Long front and rear tapers ensure this line gives the softest of presentation. Use this line for wary fish and for when fishing small flies - generally size 10 and smaller. It is also the perfect line on softer rods.

Indicator - A short front taper and front loaded weight distribution makes this line a "no brainer" choice for casting heavy nymphs or indicators. The built in indicator on the front tip also is a great boon to the more subtle nymphing approaches.

Power Fly - The heavy front end and short front taper ensures this line is perfect for casting big flie. It is also a half a line size heavier to aid the turnover of big nasties.

Smallmouth Bass - Big or air resistance flies. Warmer conditions

Steelhead/Salmon - Superb roll casting and mending. Great with heavy flies and nymphs.

OutBound - Simply the longest distance casting line ever made.

OutBound Short - Short head version of the popular OutBound - great for throwing the largest of flies and for getting easy, one-shot" distance.

Avid - Good multi-use fly line, priced at a midprice point.

MainStream - Economy fly lines

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Could you please tell me what I should or should not use to clean or dress fly lines?

Many plastic cleaners/polishes contain solvents that attack the fly line's PVC coating, and can cause it to dry out, resulting in fly line cracking. Other enemies of fly lines include most aerosol sprays (the propellants, actually), insect repellents containing DEET, solvents, gasoline, sunscreen, and excessive heat and sunlight. Check out our link Cleaning the Lines

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I have a 9' 6 wt. I'll be fishing from a drift boat as well as from the bank. I'll be casting everything from dries to streamers. What line do you suggest?

Our OutBound Short is a fantastic line for fishing out of drift boats. The short head makes easy one-shot casts to the bank and will throw over the biggest of Clousers and stonefly/hopper imitations.

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I just bought a VersiTip line, when I opened the package and inspected the tags on the tips they said that they all had the same grain weight. If they all weigh the same, how can they possibly sink at different speeds?

An easy analogy is to take a pound of cork and a pound of lead. Both weigh 1 pound, but the lead will sink and the cork will float. It is not the weight that makes them sink or float. It is the density. We can manufacture the tips to a specific density, and as a consequence, a specific sink rate. It is important that the tips weigh the same. This keeps the weight of the whole head at the optimum level for the line size, thus properly loading the rod.

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I'm the owner of a 6wt Rio Grand. I like the loop. However, I have been unable to tie a surgeons loop small enough to make a proper connection. If I cut off the loop, will this affect the line? Can you put a butt section on the line?

First off, you will have no problem, and will not compromise the fly lines taper if you cut off the welded loop. In fact many traditionalists do that. Next snipping off the loop and tying on a butt section is also perfectly fine. A smaller knot that RIO prefers is the perfection loop, the finished knot is half the size of a surgeons loop.

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What are the sink rates for the three types of sink tips?

All type 8 sink tips sink at a rate of 8" to 9" per second, all type 6 sink tips at 6'' to 7'' per second, the type 3 sinks at around 3" per second, and the intermediate sink at about 1.5" per second. The type 8 & 6 are recommended for very warm or very cold water where fish are deep and currents are strong. Type 3 are recommended for medium current and in still water where fish are 3' to 4' deep. Intermediate sink tips and shooting heads seem to be the best all around fish catching line. RIO recommends the intermediates for standard wet fly fishing, and in normal temperature waters (45F-60F).

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If I want to use an interchangeable sink tip, how and where do I put it?

You have to take out the floating tip off the fly line and replace it with the sinking tip using the loop to loop connection.

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What is SlickShooter and how do I attach it to my line?

SlickShooter is an oval shaped, nylon monofilament shooting line. The hard slick finish and oval shape make this a very fast shooting line. It has very little memory so that you can stretch it once and it will not coil. Attach this line to your backing with a double uniknot or by making a loop connection. Lefty Kreh's no-slip loop seems to be the strongest. Attach the line to your fly line again with a loop conection or with a nail knot.

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Why is SlickShooter better than other shooting lines?

SlickShooter is much slicker and the profile provides less contact on the guides. It is the favored shooting line of the Scandinavians because it not only shoots out of the guides, but it is thick enough to handle the pressure of stiking and fighting fish.

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I fish the John Day River in Oregon. I fish an 8 wt rod. My question is, What is the best sink tip, and the best floating line to use?

The best Steelhead floating line is either our Steelhead taper or the RIO Gold line. If you are spey casting and roll casting with the single handed rod, the Steelhead taper is the best choice of line. If you are only overhead casting, then go with the RIO Gold line. With regard to sink tips, this depends on how deep you want to fish. RIO has a couple of options to consider. There are two different sink rates available in the 15 ft sink tip line – a type 3 and a type 6 sinking tip, and there is also a 24' sink tip line for getting maximum depth, or for when fishing in heavy current. The 15 ft type 6 sink tip is probably the most useful, if you had to choose one.

Another option is the “VersiTip”, which is a line with a floating body section and four different 15 ft tips anglers attach and change as conditions change. The VersiTip lines come with floating tip, an intermediate sink tip, and a type 3 and a type 6 sink tip.

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Why should I buy a RIO fly line?

RIO manufactures its own fly lines. We have new technology where tolerances can be controlled better, where there is more control over centering the core, better adhesion and lubricity. The low humidity, high desert air and continuous durability testing help ensure the overall quality.The RIO staff is dedicated and commited to producing world class fly lines, leaders, and tippet materials.

This is accomplished through intensive, constant R&D and thorough field testing by RIO's staff as well as input from guides, dealers, and fly fishers everywhere.

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I received a package of RIO braided loops. When attempting to work the flyline down the braid toward the loop the braid is completely unraveling. What an I doing wrong? How should I be doing this procedure?

Braided loops are easy to fray and it is just a case of getting the knack of sliding it on without the fray. Though easy, it is very hard to describe in words. Start by cutting off all the fray before you attempt to put the line in. Make sure the sleeve is on the braided loop, as well. Slip a medium large needle into the end of the braid and gently heat the needle and rotate the needle at the same time. Be careful not to let the flame touch the braid otherwise it will burn a hole in it!

Heat the needle for about 5 seconds, then pull it out and you should be left with a large opening in the end of the braid. Cut off the burnt ends and carefully slide the fly line into the wide mouth. The heat serves two purposes, it opens up a larger hole and it sets the braid making it harder to fray. You can still fray it by rushing the line up the braid, but this is the best way of going about it.

Finally, pull the tubing down over the connection, being sure to cover the end of the braid. If you do not want to use the tubing, apply a little 'crazy glue' to keep the braid tight and eliminate fraying.

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Why do I get coils and/or memory in my fly line?

First of all, all fly lines are coiled at final manufacture to fit onto the packaging spool. This process does not add twist to the fly line, however, the line should be removed from the spool in the reverse direction. If the spool is taken apart, and the line is removed a coil at a time, this will add twist. An attempt to take out this twist by stretching the line, will result in only a temporarily straightened line. The 'energy' is still there, and is stored in the line. It will 'remember' this, and eventually try to coil back up. A salt water fly line with a braided monofilament core and harder plastisol will compound this more than a softer fresh water fly line with a nylon multifilament core.

There are several other things that will add to twist and coiling. First and foremost is fighting fish. Fish do somersaults underwater while trying to get away. Of course large saltwater species will put more twist into a fly line than a trout. Recently, we had a customer, who complained about a Deep Seas line. When he first got the line, it performed perfectly, but after several dozen big mean saltwater fish, the line acted like a slinky. Our customer could not understand what was happening. We asked for the fly line back and upon examination on the factory floor, the line had about a thousand and one twists and coils. We gently moved the coils out to the tip and voilĂ ! the line lay straight. This angler had never taken the coils out of the fly line.

Even when I put on a new fly line on to a reel, the first thing I do is unroll, (Never pull the line off coil by coil!) and stretch the line out the full length on some grass. With the thumb and forefinger starting at the end of the running line or backing, I'll move all the winds to the tip or leader end and out forever. For best results, I might do this two or three times. Leave the tip end of the line free when winding it onto the reel, or connect the tip to a swivel, and have someone keep very slight tension on it while I reel it up. I will repeat this process a couple of times during the season if I have been casting the line a lot.

Then, there is the act of casting from a boat. If the fly fisher strips off a lot of line to lie on the boat deck and then on the presentation cast does not shoot all the line, he will add twist the next time he strips back into the boat. If you experience a lot of twist while on a boat, ask your captain to troll at low speed. Cut your fly off the leader, or take off the leader. Run all the fly line out to the water behind the boat for a few minutes then as you wind in on the reel, have your captain hold the fly line between his thumb and forefinger. This will help take out any twist or coils in the fly line.

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